The Splendors of the Sea

Marine Conservation Expedition in the Seychelles

Scuba dive in the Indian Ocean on this critical conservation expedition.

Durations:  2 - 12 weeks

Program information

Get your PADI Advanced Open Water and PADI Reef Ecosystem Diver (RESD) Specialty qualifications as a member of an expedition team working on critical marine conservation projects. Your participation in marine species research will contribute towards providing data to the local government on various conservation initiatives. Partnerships such as this are vital in showing the interconnectedness between social and environmental issues and how they affect community development and conservation efforts in the pristine islands of Seychelles.

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undefined 31 May 2022
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Included in your program

Make the most of our unique programs with these exclusively curated local adventure and wellness experiences.

Learn to cook traditional Seychellois Creole dishes

Visit the Mission Ruins at Venn's Town

Paddleboard across the bay

Hike through lush forests and across rocky plateaus

Explore the ocean after dark with a night dive

Discover rare and endemic species of plants

Swim at a secret beach

Go fishing with local fishers

Connect with our alumni
Want to connect with some of our past participants about their adventures? Get in touch with hundreds of friendly ambassadors all over the world who would be more than happy to answer any questions.
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Jason Horton

16 Aug, 2021
Very good experience, learned so much about marine life and diving in general

Tom Jacobsohn

28 Jan, 2020
I took part in the marine conservation project in the Seychelles. The reason I got involved with GVI was because I knew that I wanted to do scuba diving for a longer period of time whilst meeting new people. I found GVI on the internet when searching for volunteering programmes, and found out they were a large and trustworthy organisation. The thing I loved most about my time with GVI was meeting like-minded people, as everyone was there wanting to dive and make memories. My most interesting discovery diving in the Seychelles was the level of impact global warming has had on the coral reefs. Seeing the amount of dead corals first hand really opens your eyes to the environmental issues we face today. There wasn’t anything too challenging, although you do have to get used to carrying heavy scuba tanks all day. As to the other volunteers though, they were all very welcoming and happy to help out with settling in as they would teach you all the little things about living at base that come in handy. Staff as well were really awesome people, and at first I could hardly tell they were staff since they would participate and do pretty much everything that we did. The project itself was actually getting more and more interesting as I got the chance to do more and more surveys as time went on. Training for these surveys was pretty straight forward and living at base and diving every day made remembering different names of fish and invertebrates quite easy. I remember just before joining the project I was a bit worried that I hadn’t learnt everything in time, but when you’re here you just know it. Before coming to the GVI project I had just finished my A levels in the UK, as I live there as well. I’m going into university after this trip although I didn’t really want to leave. I am definitely more aware of our impact on the oceans than I thought I would be after diving in the Seychelles. I don’t think you can really understand it unless you actually see it for yourself with your own eyes, which is why I would recommend anyone interested in diving or the oceans to come out here. My experience here was unforgettable and yours will be too. Get out here or you’ll regret not coming.

Anne Kathrine Vinding Mikkelsen

28 Jan, 2020
I was at work and came over an ad on Facebook from Kilroy with this opportunity to go to a place I didn’t know existed where I could dive and at the same time do something good for the environment. I showed it to my mom when I came home and she just said: “do it”. So I thought about it for a couple of months because I needed to figure out work, money and how and when I could fit this into my everyday life at home. So a couple of months before coming here I booked my ticket. One of the challenges here is definitely having time for it all. There’s quite much on the program with morning chores, diving, maybe chores again such as kitchen or tanks, cleaning, eating and in the first two weeks’ presentations, advanced diving and first aid. Besides having time just have fun with the other volunteers and not go to bed at 9 in the evening. Advice for someone thinking of joining is definitely to go more than a month so a month and a half to be the least. When you just got all the prework done to actually go survey, your time is almost up. Also that it doesn’t matter how inexperienced or how long time ago your last dive was, you will do good!

Christian Blair

26 Nov, 2019
I found out about GVI through a company called Go-Eco; while researching gap year programs that where dive centric. On the GVI website it told me exactly what to expect. A great time with new people and a chance to make a positive impact on the environment. I jumped into this experience head first and now that I am finishing my last week here I’m sad to go. I have made so many new friends including other volunteers and staff members. I was assigned to fish groups 1 and 2. I got my assignment a few weeks before my arrival here in the Seychelles. I was able to make good head way on my fish identification. When I got here I was knowledgeable about the fish species but not in the methodology of surveying those species. The staff made learning these techniques very easy and fun. On a typical dive I would dive with another volunteer and would survey either fish 1 or 2 meaning I would either lead or follow the dive. SPCs are quite easy but belts are a bit trickier. Because there is more to keep track of. This experience has provided me with more insight on environmental issues and has broadened my perspective on the world. I have now made many friends around the world and will also have amazing memories for the rest of my life. I will definitely recommend this program and GVI to anyone looking to do volunteer work or people who are just looking for an adventure.

Corinna Kolarczyk

26 Nov, 2019
I was joining the GVI project on the Seychells – Bay Ternay Marine Conservation for 7 weeks as a volunteer during a career break. I found the GVI organization as a recommendation whilst doing internet research. It was clear for me from the beginning that I want to join a project which is taking care for animals and/or the environment. With this marine conservation project I could as well improve my diving skills and learn a lot about marine biology in which I was already interested before I planned my career break. Due to excellent trainings and presos from the staff members I learnt much more (practical and theoretical) than I have expected. The staff on base is just awesome, there is really nothing to complain about. Living in a very diverse group for a couple of weeks in a very basic environment brought me sometimes to my limit. This was my first experience like this and I can say that I definitely would do it again if had the choice. Changing this office in Bay Ternay with mine in Germany again will be hard and I am sad to leave.

Alex Williams

26 Nov, 2019
I did the 3 months in Seychelles studying coral, and then moving on to Thailand to do my DM. I found the program and it suited to what I was looking to do, some type of marine conservation and to do my DM. The average day starts with wake up, usually between 6 and 8. Then duties, followed by diving and any other sorts of presentations. Dinner is at 6:30, every day is similar but different at the same time. I loved the staff and their commitment to everything that they do. I also loved the diving and learning about coral. The staff as I said, were absolutely stunning and very supportive of everyone and their needs. The training was very good, and informative. The support from GVI before coming here was very helpful and easy to ask questions, Glenn specifically. My proudest accomplishment here was getting signed off to survey coral. As before coming here I was in university beforehand but studying something that I don’t really have an interest in, so with this GVI program I hope I can one day get employment as a DM and working in marine conservation. I would say for advice that it’s a great program and to be prepared to work hard, but also be rewarded for it.

Bo Louis

07 Mar, 2019
After completing 4 weeks here at the GVI base in Cap Ternay I can say that it has been an incredible, eye-opening experience. I came here because I wanted a new experience and something that would allow me to find drive and motivation in life. Before arriving I was going through the toughest year of my life, 6 months earlier I had just come out of rehab and although drugs were no longer a part of my life I found it very difficult to get back on two feet and find motivation to move forward. Once arriving, I immediately felt comfortable because of the warm and helpful staff. Having a clear cut daily schedule and tasks set out to complete I found it a lot easier to wake up and start the day. Full days of learning, diving, socializing and sun-tanning meant that at the end of the day I had a feeling of accomplishment. My time here really help me find new direction in my life, I now am sure I want to pursue ecology and natural science as a profession and working to protect the beauty of nature, which is more evident here than anywhere is what I want to do. It has also made me really keen on diving, being underwater in another world, knowing many different species from the teaching of the science staff (invertebrates in particular) and actually doing something to protect these diverse reefs. Now that my stay comes to an end I wish I could spend another two weeks or even a month here. Thank you for a life changing two weeks.

Eleanor Forsyth

07 Mar, 2019
My name is Eleanor Forsyth, I’m 18 years old and I was volunteering for 6 weeks on the Cap Ternay base in the Seychelles for marine conservation. I originally chose to go on the project as marine conservation is something I’m really passionate about and due to the course I’m studying at university (biomedical engineering) I don’t get the opportunity to get involved as much as I would like to and felt like this would be a really good way to make a difference and contribute to something as well as gaining more knowledge. When I arrived, the first week was a whirlwind of activities, like trying to learn your allocated fish study, keep up with daily duties, taking your Emergency First Response course and get settled in on base. It was tiring but crazy fun and was a great way to get to know everyone. It gave us all the information we needed about the work we would be doing over the next few weeks and meant we could start surveying as soon as possible. After the orientation and workshops that take place during the first week on base, the average day consisted greatly of duties (compressing tanks, making food for everyone, cleaning grounds etc) and diving. Most days I was diving twice a day doing invert surveys which was super fun getting to learn about all the different kinds of inverts and seeing some of the larger megafauna like turtles and whitetip sharks. One group was lucky enough to even see a whale shark while I was there! My favourite were the huge rays and turtles as sometimes they would even swim along with us for a while. Diving was without a doubt the biggest highlight of my time in the Seychelles! Although making friends for life made the trip completely unforgettable and the experience wouldn’t have been the same without all the other amazing volunteers and staff on base. As well as diving we also had movie nights, documentary nights, BBQ Thursday, and a long weekend where we could go and visit other islands. On my long weekend me and a few of the other volunteers booked a villa on Praslin where we could relax and snorkel on the beaches nearby. It was super fun and was nice to have a break from duties around base for a few days and just get to chill and hang out together. Overall I really feel the trip has given me a new perspective and insight into marine conservation which has enhanced my knowledge far more than reading from a book ever will. Not only has volunteering enhanced my CV it has given me more confidence within myself and countless other transferable skills that I can carry into daily life and my work place back home in the UK. I cannot recommend it highly enough. The biggest piece of advice I can give to anyone debating whether to go for it is just to go for it! I can promise you won't regret it and it will 100% change your life!

Mimi Black

07 Mar, 2019
I volunteered on the GVI Seychelles Cap Ternay for weeks. I got involved with GVI through their website after researching volunteer projects abroad that including diving and GVI looked the most interesting. On an average day, we would wake up for our duties and then would dive once or twice during the day with relaxing or sunbathing in between dives. My highlights were swimming with a Whale Shark on a fun dive during my second week. It was towards the end of our dive and swam with us for a while. Other highlights were seeing seeing turtles, rays and sharks. I loved about GVI was the diving and how friendly everyone was, the atmosphere on base was very fun. The staff were very lovely and always very helpful with questions I had about island tours or diving etc. The project overall I enjoyed a lot and diving every day in Seychelles was paradise. I wish I could have dived everyday twice. The training was very helpful, however I wish we could have had more time in the beginning for training so I could have done more surveys. The GVI support was very good, someone was always in the office if I needed to ask a staff member for help. My proudest accomplishment was diving my first deep dive down to 30m which scared me at first but once we were at 30m it didn’t feel any different to being 10m. Before coming to GVI I was working in an Architect’s firm for 12 month placement as part of my university degree.

Sean Nordgren-Sewell

07 Mar, 2019
The project that took part in was the Seychelles Environmental conservation at Cap Ternay starting on May 18 th ending on July 21 st . I became involved with GVI because I was taking a year out of education, between secondary school and university, to attempt travel around and broaden my horizons. I was searching for something which would have a positive impact on both me and the world, but also involved diving since it is a huge passion of mine. I stumbled upon this GVI project on a website which is dedicated to volunteering and it caught my eye instantly with its wonderful location and intriguing description. The average day at Cap Ternay would begin with a wake up at around 7:30 which is followed by duties around the base like preparing breakfast or cleaning then bathrooms. The highlight of certain morning would be the breakfast cuisine; it being eggs and bacon on one day or pancakes on another, though the porridge with freshly cut apples always seemed to fill an empty stomach. Another highlight would of course be the diving, seeing what lurks beneath the waves is truly a wonderful experience and being at Cap Ternay enables us to see it closer and easier than many other people. The aspect that I loved the most at GVI was the serenity of the surroundings with both the people, staff and volunteers, and the environment complimenting each other to form a lovely place to live for two months in. My most interesting discovery would be learning about the fish that I was required to survey during my time here. It was quite daunting being presented with over 60 fish to learn off by heart but when one sees the fish in real life while diving it becomes far more easy to recognize, especially when there is staff always eager to help. Some of the challenges that I was presented with are ones like having to cook for 25 people which always takes longer than you think! As I said previously both the staff and the volunteers were lovely to live around there was never any situations which was short of a joke or two. Generally speaking the volunteers were all sociable people who had stories to share. The project itself was very enjoyable and taught me many things about marine life. The training was very good and the staff was always there to help out if any of us were struggling. My proudest accomplishment would be achieving my PADI advanced open water certificate. My outlook has changed since I care more about marine conservation now and how things affect our seas and oceans. One thing I would recommend someone joining GVI would be that you have to prepare for cold showers and being a tad bit dirty all of the time.

Martin Balzarek

07 Mar, 2019
I am Martin and working was an auditor at HSBC focusing on Information Technology. In the past years I used my holidays to join other volunteering projects i.e. in Namibia (EHRA, focus on Elephants in the dessert) and Mozambique (Marine Reasearch, focus on Whale Sharks and Humback Whales). This way of spending my holidays gives me the best opportunity to get a different view on my obviously very risk adverse and strict job. The German agency TravelWorks convinced me to stay with GVI in Cap Ternay on the Seychelles for four weeks. During my stay I noticed that the project is very well organized, particularly in comparison to another marine research project that I joined in 2016. There was a schedule for every day and the team always tried (and in most cases succeeded) to stick to this schedule. Additionally, the team on base was always friendly and willing to help. They all did a very good job. One of the highlights with relation the staff for me were the dinners prepared by them. Please continue to do so – it was always very tasty. There are only two things that could be improved in the future. The first is on open and friendly behavior. One day, the country manager Chris came here but unfortunately did not say hello to all e.g. at breakfast and also not to me when went into the office. The second relates to the living conditions on base. It would be great if the team tries to solve technical issue that have been addressed in Tuesday evening’s meeting within a shorter period of time (we had a sink that did not drain for 1.5 weeks and a ticking fan as well as a broken lightball for 4 weeks). However, the living conditions on base were good and better then what I expected. Nevertheless, there are a few things that I would like to highlight that you may start to think about. Of course, we try to save water, collect litter and provide our share for the environment. However, please also consider to have more eco-friendly cars. In particular, the first car, which was used to get the dive kits to the beach, lost a lot of oil. Furthermore, I do not feel like I was able to provide my share for the project. In the end I could do only one survey. This is somehow related to the very low number of dives (18 in 4 weeks) and also to the way the training was done. Half of the training was not relevant for me (EFR and also AOW because I got both already), thus the first week was unnecessary with regard to me, and the theoretical part of the survey related training started only in week 2 and was only finished by end of week 3. Due to the additional 9 practical training dives, I did only one survey at the end, which is not was I expected upfront and disappointing. The most compensating factor to this are the other volunteers on base. Almost all of them are very nice people and became my new friends. I had a lot fun with them and will definitely stay in contact with them in the future. An in all, I was happy to take the opportunity to stay here with GVI and I may join one of your other projects in the future.

Anna Merk

07 Mar, 2019
Before joining GVI I graduated University (B.Sc. Biology). In order to learn something about the work in the field of marine biology I joined the marine conservation project at Cap Ternay (Seychelles). So a normal day at Cap Ternay normally starts around 7 am. Every volunteer has duties to do around base first. This includes cooking, cleaning, preparing the boat or filling the tanks for the upcoming dives. After the duties are done Breakfast awaits you! Most days this means porridge with fruit but there are also special days during the week like the beloved pancake Thursday! After the Breakfast the best part of the day starts: going on a dive. For me it started with several dives in order to get my Advanced Open Water qualification. After that we started with fish spotting which means that a staff member points out fish during your dive and you have to write down which one it is. After practicing that for a long time the methodology training started during which you learn how to do a real survey. When you manage to handle a SMB, a tape, and watching out for fish and writing them down you are ready for real surveys! And this is a really good feeling. Finally you have your chance to collect important data. And diving at the Seychelles is for sure an experience itself! There are loads of colorful fish surrounding you and it’s a really cool feeling to even know the name of those fish. So the diving is what you are here for and it is the absolute highlight of each day. After returning from your dive either lunch or dinner awaits you prepared by the volunteers who get really creative in that task and are able to make rice and beans taste different every day! After dinner there is time for socializing and playing games or just watch a film together at movie nights. Apart from that the base is set in a stunning environment which you can explore more on the weekends. Even after one month I look around and still cannot believe that I am actually here. Although the environment is beautiful it was a bit challenging to get used to the really basic conditions at base. Sharing a non-flushing toilet with 12 other people is an experience (but no worries the provided flush buckets work well). Staff at base were wonderful: really friendly, caring and really competent in all the marine stuff. So the training as well was really good. They really made us feel as we were at home at base and did everything they could to make our stay more confi. I think the stay with GVI will help my future as I gained a lot of new diving skills that I can use on upcoming marine biology projects. Knowing a lot of different fish also makes diving itself a new experience to me. I would recommend this program to everyone who is interested in marine biology. But do not expect to do a lot of real surveys and therefore really make a difference (as GVI always points out). If the base is as crowded as it was during my stay most of the time you will have only one dive a day what is fair enough but expands the training time which is really needed. So after one month here I did 4 surveys and I really wish it would have been more.

Sandra Schmidt

07 Mar, 2019
did the GVI Seychelles Mahe project at Cap Ternay. I learned about project through the volunteer page GoEco. An average day here starts with a wakeup between 7 and 8 in the morning and doing your duties afterwards – depending what duty group your in. Duties can either be “Kitchen” – you prepare breakfast, lunch and dinner for the whole camp – “Tanks & Grounds” – you clean the bathrooms, recycle the garbage, clean the towels from the kitchen and throughout the day go on the compressor – or “Boats” – you lay out all the equipment that goes on the boat and if there is low tide you have to take the boat out with a staff member. After you have finished your duties it is time for breakfast and then for Wave 1 of the day. You have two dives a day. If your lucky and there is high tide you just have to walk a few meters from the beach to the boat with your equipment. If not, it is 250 meters to the boat. Before you are allowed to survey you are going on spots to test your knowledge on corals/fish/invertebrates after you have passed your exam and done all your spots you are doing surveys. Depending on what waves you are on you will then either eat your lunch on the boat or on base. After your last dive of the day you either have free time until dinner or have to do your duty. After dinner you are done for the day but most of the volunteers watch a movie or documentary once a week. There is also a party night once a week where the staff cooks for us volunteers and it also has a funny dress theme. I loved that I was amongst people who had the same interests in the environment and love diving. Some of my most interesting discoveries here were on my Adventure Deep Dive where we drank at 26 metres from a coke can and cracked open an egg and played with the yoke. Also being on my own in a foreign country was also very interesting because it challenged me every day. One of those challenges was the first week because I did not have a free minute the first few days because of duties and workshops. And also cooking for approximately 20 people is something I have never done before. The other volunteers were almost all around my age and all very nice which made my stay here even better. The staff was also very nice. I think the project and the work that is done here is very important in protecting and understanding the underwater world around here better. Unfortunately because of ear problems I never got to survey here but I very much enjoyed the fish spots because it was just fun to identify the different fish and I also liked the Dive against Debris because it is very important to keep our oceans clean. The training was interesting and also fun. Before coming here, I never was in contact with GVI directly because I booked this with a different company but here at base the stuff was very supportive with every question and problem I had. Two of my proudest accomplishments here were passing my fish exam and participating inthe Beach Race were my team walked almost for 22 km. I came here in my summer break from university where I study economics and law. After seeing what the coral bleaching did to the coral reefs here my opinion that reefs should be more protected and climate change should be bigger conversation with bigger actions only manifested. My advice for future volunteers who are thinking of joining GVI would be: Just do it, you will not regret it! But be sure to not expect hot showers!

Juliette Thibodeau

07 Mar, 2019
I worked on the GVI project in Mahe, Seychelles. I became involved in this project after searching online for a marine conservation organization to work with. I had a wonderful experience, and I’m very glad that I was able to participate in this project. The staff and other volunteers were very easy to get along with. Despite already having somewhat of a background in biology, I was able to learn a great deal about marine life, seeing firsthand how a marine conservation organization makes an impact. Everyone involved in this project was very fun-loving and playful, and it was incredible to be surrounded by a community of people as in love with the ocean as I am. The training was useful, and it was very exciting to finally begin surveying and seeing how what we were doing could help with future research. As someone going into my first year of college, this experience has definitely opened my mind to possibilities for studying or a job. To someone thinking of joining GVI, I would say that it is absolutely worth it. You will meet people from all over the world, not only learning about marine life with them, but also about different perspectives from other volunteers.

Tom Jacobsohn

06 Mar, 2019
I took part in the marine conservation project in the Seychelles. The reason I got involved with GVI was because I knew that I wanted to do scuba diving for a longer period of time whilst meeting new people. I found GVI on the internet when searching for volunteering programmes, and found out they were a large and trustworthy organisation. The thing I loved most about my time with GVI was meeting like-minded people, as everyone was there wanting to dive and make memories. My most interesting discovery diving in the Seychelles was the level of impact global warming has had on the coral reefs. Seeing the amount of dead corals first hand really opens your eyes to the environmental issues we face today. There wasn’t anything too challenging, although you do have to get used to carrying heavy scuba tanks all day. As to the other volunteers though, they were all very welcoming and happy to help out with settling in as they would teach you all the little things about living at base that come in handy. Staff as well were really awesome people, and at first I could hardly tell they were staff since they would participate and do pretty much everything that we did. The project itself was actually getting more and more interesting as I got the chance to do more and more surveys as time went on. Training for these surveys was pretty straight forward and living at base and diving every day made remembering different names of fish and invertebrates quite easy. I remember just before joining the project I was a bit worried that I hadn’t learnt everything in time, but when you’re here you just know it. Before coming to the GVI project I had just finished my A levels in the UK, as I live there as well. I’m going into university after this trip although I didn’t really want to leave. I am definitely more aware of our impact on the oceans than I thought I would be after diving in the Seychelles. I don’t think you can really understand it unless you actually see it for yourself with your own eyes, which is why I would recommend anyone interested in diving or the oceans to come out here. My experience here was unforgettable and yours will be too. Get out here or you’ll regret not coming.

Kira Bleuler

11 Oct, 2018
The two months I spent on the Seychelles with GVI were part of the best time of my life! I met the coolest people and had loads of fun diving. I was definitely an experience I’ll never forget. It was amazing to do what I love, diving, with a purpose. Doing the fish surveys was not only interesting but also made me feel useful. In my opinion it’s important to see how healthy all the components of the reef are, to take action if somethings going wrong. I’m really happy that was able to take part in monitoring the reefs around the Seychelles. To travel with GVI was the perfect way for me, because it combined travelling with actually doing something for the environment, meeting people from all over the world and especially seeing and doing things that I’d have probably never done alone. I wish I could go back!

Maria Antonia Rupp Pardos

11 Oct, 2018
We arrived in the Seychelles on the 7th of January, immediately we were blown away by the incredible nature. Life on base at first was a little shocking to me but I got used to it so quickly and really started loving it. It made me see how fortunate we are to live the way we do at home but also how i don't need a luxurious life as long as it is fulfilling. Cap Ternay is an awesome place, after long dive days we would chill in the hammocks on base and listen to music. During the day we did our surveys and not rarely came across white tips and turtles. The underwater world has so much to offer, it's a world full of excitement and peace. On one weekend we did a trip to Bird Island which was probably the most exciting part of my two months in Seychelles. The conservationists showed us around the little beautiful island and explains its nature to us. On one evening, as the sun was setting, he invited us to witness how he releases a bunch of just hatched turtles. This was probably the most amazing thing I've ever seen. All in all can I say that the two months in the Seychelles were probably the best of my life, I've learned so much not only about marine biology and our environment but also about my self and about life. Thank you for everything, GVI! I hope to join on if your other projects soon!

Leigh-Anne Webster

11 Oct, 2018
My first week with GVI Mahe, Seychelles at Cap Ternay was a very busy one, the amount of information I learnt in such a short period of time was astounding, and yet I thrived to want to learn more. Helping the marine environment and learning more about it is something I hold dear and it wasn't just about having fun it was serious and to know the work we were doing was making a substantial difference. If more people can do what I have done all around the world then there is a slight hope in saving some of our coral reefs and marine life which have nearly been lost. Also teaching this to the local school in Seychelles was another amazing experience, they want to listen and knowing they will grow up with this knowledge from GVI staff already makes the world a better place. Everything about the program was inspirational.

James Mckie

11 Oct, 2018
When I announced to friends and family my travel plans to volunteer in the Seychelles many replied with 'Wheres that?'. My fascination with idealic islands and making an impact has always been in my thoughts while daydreaming at my desk. In truth this would not be the first time I have done something like this and I knew GVI would not disappoint. When arriving in Mahe my thoughts and apprehension quickly disappeared when meeting the excited and down to earth group. A great mix of ages and backgrounds from all over the globe made a dynamic and set of people I would soon call friends. Our first week was about refreshing dive skills and advanced courses taking place. A combination of buoyancy control involving swimming through hoops and forward rolls was fun and quickly drew confidence. This advanced to fish or coral studies and writing on our dive slates in order to identify ourselves with different species. I could not believe the abundance of life with hawksbill turtles, white tip reef sharks, and devil rays fast becoming a common site. As the days merged into weeks we started to feel like genuine experts through identifying and research techniques. When the project drew to an end it was difficult to say goodbye but somehow I feel I make a return one day. I recommend this to absolutely anyone and just take the plunge (wink).**

Lynsey Wheater

25 Nov, 2013
I had a brilliant time, the staff were really friendly and welcoming and I loved all the activities. There was so much variety and a lot to learn - I would definitely go back. This experience has made me change my career to what I love and I’m currently now looking for marine research/science work throughout the world. The GVI experience has made me reconsider what I want from life.

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